Books

Reclaiming the State: A Progressive Vision of Sovereignty for a Post-Neoliberal World

William Mitchell and Thomas Fazi

Published September 15, 2017, Pluto Books, UK.

The crisis of the neoliberal order has resuscitated a political idea widely believed to be consigned to the dustbin of history. Brexit, the election of Donald Trump, and the neo-nationalist, anti-globalisation and anti-establishment backlash engulfing the West all involve a yearning for a relic of the past: national sovereignty. In response to these challenging times, economist William Mitchell and political theorist Thomas Fazi reconceptualise the nation state as a vehicle for progressive change.

They show how despite the ravages of neoliberalism, the state still contains resources for democratic control of a nation's economy and finances. The populist turn provides an opening to develop an ambitious but feasible left political strategy. Reclaiming the Nation State offers an urgent, provocative and prescient political analysis of our current predicament, and lays out a comprehensive strategy for revitalising progressive economics in the 21st century.

Eurozone Dystopia: Groupthink and Denial on a Grand Scale

William Mitchell, Professor of Economics, Centre of Full Employment and Equity, University of Newcastle, Australia.

Published 2015, Edward Elgar Co.

Eurozone Dystopia traces the origin of the Eurozone and shows how the historical Franco-German rivalry combined with the growing dominance of neo-liberal economic thinking to create a monetary system that was deeply flawed and destined to fail. William Mitchell argues that the political class in Europe is trapped in a destructive groupthink. Based on a flawed understanding of macroeconomic fundamentals, groupthink extols the virtues of the erroneous concept of the self-regulating free market and prevents Europe from seeing its own policy failures. As a result, millions are unemployed, with imperilled member states caught in a cycle of persistent stagnation and rising social instability.

Providing a detailed historical analysis of the evolution of the Eurozone and its failings from the 1940s to the present day, the book argues that the Eurozone lacks the necessary monetary architecture, particularly the existence of a federal fiscal function which could have resolved the economic crisis quickly. The author examines the options available to Europe and concludes that an orderly abandonment of the euro and a return to national currencies is the superior option available. The justification for this conclusion is exhaustively argued within a Modern Monetary Theory framework. This thoughtful and accessible account of Europe’s economic woes will appeal to all those who are seeking an explanation for the crisis and are receptive to sensible and credible alternatives to the current scenario.

Modern Monetary Theory and Practice: An Introductory Text

William Mitchell, Professor of Economics, Centre of Full Employment and Equity, University of Newcastle, Australia; L. Randall Wray, Professor of Economics, Levy Institute and Bard College, USA; and Martin Watts, Professor of Economics, Centre of Full Employment and Equity, University of Newcastle, Australia.

Published March 2016

This edition contains 15 Chapters and is designed as an introductory textbook for university-level macroeconomics students.

It is based on the principles of Modern Monetary Theory (MMT) and includes the following detailed chapters:

Chapter 1: Introduction
Chapter 2: How to Think and Do Macroeconomics
Chapter 3: A Brief Overview of the Economic History and the Rise of Capitalism
Chapter 4: The System of National Income and Product Accounts
Chapter 5: Sectoral Accounting and the Flow of Funds
Chapter 6: Introduction to Sovereign Currency: The Government and its Money
Chapter 7: The Real Expenditure Model
Chapter 8: Introduction to Aggregate Supply
Chapter 9: Labour Market Concepts and Measurement
Chapter 10: Money and Banking
Chapter 11: Unemployment and Inflation
Chapter 12: Full Employment Policy
Chapter 13: Introduction to Monetary and Fiscal Policy Operations
Chapter 14: Fiscal Policy in Sovereign nations
Chapter 15: Monetary Policy in Sovereign Nations

It is intended as an introductory course in macroeconomics and the narrative is accessible to students of all backgrounds. All mathematical and advanced material appears in separate Appendices.

An expanded edition covering both the introductory and intermediate years of university-level macroeconomics (first and second years of study) will be published around mid-2016. It will contain an additional 10 Chapters and include more advanced material as well as the same material presented in this Introductory text.



Purchase at:

1. Amazon.com ($US60)

2. Amazon.co.uk (£42.00)

3. Amazon Europe Portal (€58.85)

4. Create Space Portal ($US60)



Full Employment Abandoned: Shifting Sands and Policy Failures

William Mitchell, Professor of Economics, Centre of Full Employment and Equity, University of Newcastle, Australia and Joan Muysken, Professor of Economics, CofFEE-Europe, University of Maastricht, The Netherlands

Published 2008, Edward Elgar Co.

This book dismantles the arguments used by policy makers to justify the abandonment of full employment as a valid goal of national governments. Bill Mitchell and Joan Muysken trace the theoretical analysis of the nature and causes of unemployment over the last 150 years and argue that the shift from involuntary to ‘natural rate’ conceptions of unemployment since the 1960s has driven an ideological backlash against Keynesian policy interventions.

The authors contend that neo-liberal governments now consider unemployment to be an individual problem rather than a reflection of systemic policy failure and that they are content to use unemployment as a policy instrument to control inflation and coerce the unemployed with work tests and compliance programmes rather than provide sufficient employment. They present a comprehensive theoretical and empirical critique of this policy approach, with a refreshing new framework for understanding modern monetary economies. The authors show that the reinstatement of full employment with price stability is a viable policy goal that can be achieved by activist fiscal policy through the introduction of a Job Guarantee.

Full Employment Abandoned will appeal to graduate and postgraduate students and researchers of economics and politics with an interest in macroeconomic policy and the labour market, particularly unemployment and neo-liberal policy frameworks.

‘This book by William Mitchell and Joan Muysken is both important and timely. It deals with the issue of the abandonment of full employment as an objective of economic policy in the OECD countries. It argues persuasively that macroeconomic policy has been restrictive over the recent, and not so recent past, and has produced substantial open and disguised unemployment. But the authors show how a job guarantee policy can enable workers, who would otherwise be unemployed, to earn a wage and not depend on welfare support. If such a policy is fully supported by appropriate fiscal and monetary programmes, it can create full employment with price stability, which the authors label as a Non-Accelerating-Inflation-Buffer Employment Ratio (NAIBER). This book is essential reading for any one wishing to understand how we can return to full employment as the normal state of affairs.’ – Philip Arestis, University of Cambridge, UK

Growth and Cohesion in the European Union The Impact of Macroeconomic Policy

Edited by William Mitchell, Professor of Economics, Centre of Full Employment and Equity, University of Newcastle, Australia, Joan Muysken, Professor of Economics, CofFEE-Europe, University of Maastricht, The Netherlands and Tom Van Veen, Associate Professor of Economics, Maastricht University, The Netherlands

Published 2006, Edward Elgar Co.

This book is a critical review of current fiscal and monetary policy in Europe and presents results of both empirical research and a discussion of the theoretical framework behind the policy of the European Central Bank and the Stability and Growth Pact.

Macroeconomic policy is often hotly debated within the EU. However, the majority of policy discussions have started from a shared view of how the economy works. This shared neo-classical view is also known as the ‘Brussels–Frankfurt consensus’. According to that consensus, European labour markets are too rigid in comparison to the US labour market. Hence, the prevalent view is that the European unemployment problem can be solved by increasing incentives; improving the returns on schooling and redefining the role and the necessity of labour market institutions. In this volume the authors argue that it is not at all clear which institutions cause labour market rigidities and to what extent. They note that the problem of unemployment requires a much broader set of solutions, including active labour market policies, policies concerning schooling and the development of skills. Growth and Cohesion in the European Union also highlights that these microeconomic policies will not in themselves provide the solution to what is essentially a macroeconomic problem. First and foremost the role of aggregate demand in the determination of unemployment has to be placed at the forefront of the debate.

The extensive discussion of a broad variety of topics in the field of macroeconomic policy will ensure this book finds a welcome readership amongst researchers and academics of European studies and macroeconomics. Policy advisors will also find much to engage them as the book provides a critical view on the Brussels–Frankfurt consensus, currently so dominant amongst European policymakers.

Unemployment: the tip of the iceberg

William Mitchell, Professor of Economics, Centre of Full Employment and Equity, University of Newcastle, Australia and Ellen Carlson (eds).

Published 2001, UNSW Press.

This book contains analyses showing that governments have abandoned full employment and instead use the unemployed as a buffer stock in the fight against inflation.

The Chapters are: Pathology of unemployment -- Hidden unemployment in Australia -- Labour underutilisation in Australia and the USA -- Demographic and industry employment changes in a high pressure economy -- Unemployed cannot find jobs that are not there! -- Youth unemployment and government policy in Australia -- Older male workers and social security reliance -- Non-standard employment -- Wage polarisation and unemployment in Australia -- Full employment abandoned - the role of the public sector -- Unemployment and fiscal policy -- Policies for full employment

278 pages.

Some copies are still available for sale - contact Bill for availability






The Urgency of Full Employment

Ellen Carlson and William Mitchell, Professor of Economics, Centre of Full Employment and Equity, University of Newcastle, Australia and Ellen Carlson (eds).

Published 2002, UNSW Press, ISBN: 0733419739.

Unemployment is the biggest problem facing Australian society and exacerbates most other problems. The unemployment rate has been ratcheting upwards over successive cycles in Australia since 1976. The problem is significantly worse than most people realise as the measured unemployment rate substantially understates the actual problem. Under neo-liberal policies, unemployment rates in almost all OECD economies have been rising to unacceptably high levels since the mid-1970s. The prevailing orthodoxy amongst economists and policy makers blames the persistently high unemployment on institutional arrangements in the labour market.

In Australia the federal government has effectively abandoned the goal of full employment and instead appears satisfied with pursuing the diminished goal of full employability. The government is no longer committed to providing an adequate number of jobs, but focuses instead, on making individuals 'work ready', should jobs ever become available. Yet there is strong evidence that the Australian economy has been demand constrained since 1975 and simply failing to generate sufficient employment, so that active labour market programs are ineffective. There is no point in preparing the people for jobs which simply are not there.

The Urgency of Full Employment contains contributions addressing these issues by leading international and Australian scholars. The well balanced mixture of theoretical and applied analysis in this book makes fundamental contributions to our understanding of the employment issue, highlighting the urgent need for a rethinking of the role of full employment on the political and economic agenda. The research will stimulate debate on the development and implementation of alternative policies to those which have failed to solve the persistent waste of our labour resources.

263 pages.

Some copies available - contact Bill for availability






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Chapters in Books

This archive goes up to 2014 and there are some entries that are still being compiled after that point.

W.F. Mitchell (1988) ‘The economic implications of high population growth’, in Lincoln H. Day and D.T. Rowland (eds.), Australian Studies: How Many More Australians? The Resource and Environmental Conflicts, Longman Cheshire, 79-92
W.F. Mitchell (1989) 'Financing the Public Sector', Part 4 of State of Siege, Pluto Press, Australia.
W.F. Mitchell (1991) ‘Some Economic Aspects of Immigration’, in Joseph Smith (ed.), Immigration, Population and Sustainable Environments: The Limits to Australia’s Growth, The Flinders Press, Adelaide.
W.F. Mitchell, R.H. Green, and M.J. Watts (1993) ‘Economic Policy in Crisis: A Proposal for Jobs and Growth’, in Hodgkinson, A., Kelly, D. and Verrucci, N. (eds.) Responding to Unemployment: Perspectives and Strategies, Labour Market Analysis Program, Wollongong University.
W.F. Mitchell, C. Mitchell and M.J. Watts (1995) ‘Labour Market Definition, Quality of Labour and Wages’, Commonwealth Grants Commission Research Report, Vol. II, AGPS, 1995, 129-263.n/a
W.F. Mitchell, R.H. Green and M.J. Watts (1997) ‘The Accord, Trade Unions and the Australian Labour Market’, in P. Kriesler, P. (ed.) The Australian Economy: The Essential Guide 2, Allen and Unwin, Sydney.
J. Burgess and W.F. Mitchell (1998) ‘Eight Propositions About Unemployment: An Australian Perspective’ in International Industrial Relations Society, Developing competitiveness and social justice, Sinea International, Geneva, September.n/a
J. Burgess and W.F. Mitchell (1998) ‘Unemployment, Human Rights and a Full Employment Policy in Australia’, in Melinda Jones and Peter Kriesler (eds.), Globalisation, Human Rights and Civil Society, Prospect Press: Sydney.
W.F. Mitchell (1998) ‘Full Employment Abandoned: The Macroeconomic Story’, in M. Carman and I. Rogers (eds.), Out of the Rut, Allen and Unwin, Sydney.
J. Burgess, W.F. Mitchell and M.J. Watts (1999) ‘The Labour Market since Howard’, in Kriesler, P. (ed.) The Australian Economy: The Essential Guide 3, Allen and Unwin, Sydney.
J. Burgess, W.F. Mitchell, D.J. O’Brien and M.J. Watts (1999), ‘Work for the Dole in Australia and New Zealand: A Critical Assessment’, in J. Lee, B. Probert and R. Watts (eds.) Work in the New Economy: Policy, Programs, Populations, Centre for Applied Social Research (CASR), RMIT University, Melbourne, 81-101.
W.F. Mitchell (2000) ‘The Causes of Unemployment’, in Stephen Bell (ed.) The Unemployment Crisis: Which Way Out?, Cambridge University Press, Sydney.n/a
W.F. Mitchell (2000) ‘Modelling the Impact of the Accord on Wage Inflation’, in K. Wilson, J. Bradford, and M. Fitzpatrick (eds.), Australia in Accord, An Evaluation of the Prices and Incomes Accord in the Hawke-Keating years, South Pacific Publishing: Melbourne, 215-231.
W.F. Mitchell (2001) ‘The Pathology of Unemployment’, in W.F. Mitchell and E. Carlson (2001) Unemployment: the Tip of the Iceberg, CAER/UNSW Press, Sydney, 11-32.
W.F. Mitchell (2001) ‘Hidden Unemployment in Australia’, in W.F. Mitchell and E. Carlson (2001) Unemployment: the Tip of the Iceberg, CAER/UNSW Press, Sydney, 33-46.
W.F. Mitchell and E. Carlson (2001) ‘Labour underutilisation and underemployment in Australia and the USA’, in W.F. Mitchell and E. Carlson (2001) Unemployment: the Tip of the Iceberg, CAER/UNSW Press, Sydney, 47-68.
W.F. Mitchell (2001) ‘Demographic and industry employment changes in a high pressure economy’, in W.F. Mitchell and E. Carlson (2001) Unemployment: the Tip of the Iceberg, CAER/UNSW Press, Sydney, 69-84.
W.F. Mitchell (2001) ‘The unemployed cannot find jobs that are not there’, in W.F. Mitchell and E. Carlson (2001) Unemployment: the Tip of the Iceberg, CAER/UNSW Press, Sydney, 85-117.
W.F. Mitchell (2001) ‘Full employment abandoned – the role of the public sector’, in W.F. Mitchell and E. Carlson (2001) Unemployment: the Tip of the Iceberg, CAER/UNSW Press, Sydney, 193-218.
M.J. Watts and W.F. Mitchell (2001) ‘Unemployment Theories’, in J. Michie (ed.) Reader’s Guide to the Social Sciences, Fitzroy Dearborn, London, 1712-13.
W.F. Mitchell and W. Mosler (2001) ‘Unemployment and fiscal policy', in W.F. Mitchell and E. Carlson (2001) Unemployment: the Tip of the Iceberg, CAER/UNSW Press, Sydney, 219-232.
E. Carlson, S. Cowling. and W.F. Mitchell (2002) ‘Introduction’ in E. Carlson and W.F. Mitchell (eds.) The Urgency of Full Employment, CAER/UNSW Press, Sydney, 9-20.
W.F. Mitchell and M.J. Watts (2002) ‘Restoring Full Employment: the Job Guarantee’ in E. Carlson and W.F. Mitchell (eds.) The Urgency of Full Employment, CAER/UNSW Press, Sydney, 95-114.
W.F. Mitchell and J. Muysken (2002) ‘Aggregate demand should do the job’ in E. Carlson and W.F. Mitchell (eds.) The Urgency of Full Employment, CAER/UNSW Press, Sydney, 133-158.
E. Carlson, W.F. Mitchell and M.J. Watts (2003) ‘The Impact of New Forms of Wage Setting on Wage Outcomes in Australia’, in J. Burgess and D. Macdonald (eds.) Developments in Enterprise Bargaining in Australia, Tertiary Press, Melbourne, 118-140.
W.F. Mitchell (2003) ‘The Job Guarantee model: Full Employment in a small open economy’, in E.J. Nell (ed.) Reinventing Functional Finance: Transformational Growth and Full Employment, Edward Elgar, New York, 278-295, June.
W.F. Mitchell and M.J. Watts (2003) ‘Full Employment’ in J.E. King (ed.) The Elgar Companion to Post Keynesian Economics, Edward Elgar, Cheltenham UK, 153-159.
LaJeunesse, R., Mitchell, W.F. and Watts, M. (2006) 'The Economics of Industrial Relations Reform', WorkChoices: the New Industrial Relations Agenda, Pearson Australia, Frenches Forest, NSW, 123-141.
W.F. Mitchell and J. Muysken (2006) ‘The Brussels-Frankfurt consensus: an answer to the wrong question’, in W.F. Mitchell, J. Muysken and T. Van Veen (2006) (eds.) Growth and Cohesion in the European Union, Edward Elgar, Cheltenham, 3-31.
W.F. Mitchell and J. Juniper (2007), ‘Towards a Spatial Keynesian economics’, in: Arestis, P. and G. Zezza (eds.) Advances in Monetary Policy and Macroeconomics, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 192-211.
W.F.Mitchell (2008) ‘Unemployment Rate’, International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences. Ed. William A. Darity, Jr.. Vol. 8. 2nd ed. Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA, 2008. 499-505.
W.F. Mitchell (2009) ‘Why public sector job creation should be fashionable’, Arestis, P. and McCombie, J. (eds.) Missing Links in the Unemployment Relationship, Palgrave Macmillan, 113-132.
W.F. Mitchell (2011) ‘Exploring Regional Disparities in Employment Growth’, in: Kourtit, K., Nijkamp, P. and Stough, R. (eds) Drivers of Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Regional Dynamics, Springer-Verlag, 337-359.
W.F. Mitchell (2013) ‘Full Employment Abandoned: the Triumph of Ideology over Evidence’, in: Meihers, H. and van Veen, T. (eds.) Decades of Economic Diversity: Essays on Labour, Technology and Monetary Economics in honour of prof. dr. Joan Muysken, Maastricht, Maastricht University, 95-113.
W.F. Mitchell (2014) ‘Spatial econometric modelling’, in: Stimson, R.J. (ed.) Handbook of Research Methods and Applications in Spatially Integrated Social Science, Cheltenham, Edward Elgar, 345-378.n/a

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Journal Articles

This archive goes up to 2011. I am still compiling articles published after that point.

W.F. Mitchell (1983) 'Equal Pay for Women: A Reply’, Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Summer.
M. Burns and W.F. Mitchell (1985) 'Real Wages, Unemployment and Economic Policy in Australia’, Australian Economic Papers, June.
W.F. Mitchell and M.J. Watts (1985) 'Efficiency under Capitalist Production: A Critique and Reformulation’, Review of Radical Political Economics, 17(1, 2), 212-220.
W.F. Mitchell (1986) 'Productivity and the National Wage Case’, Labour Resourcer, Labour Resource Centre, April.N/A
W.F. Mitchell (1987) 'The NAIRU, Structural Imbalance and the Macroeconomic Equilibrium Unemployment Rate, Australian Economic Papers, June.
W.F. Mitchell (1987) 'What is the Full Employment Unemployment Rate: Some Empirical Evidence of Structural Unemployment in Australia, 1966 to 1986, Australian Bulletin of Labour, 14(1), December.
W.F. Mitchell (1988) 'No Need to Privatise’ Australian Society, June.
W.F. Mitchell (1990) 'The Scandinavian Model of Inflation and its Applicability to Australian Wage Setting’, Australian Bulletin of Labour, March.
M.J. Watts and W.F. Mitchell (1990) 'Australian Wage Inflation: Real Wage Resistance, Hysteresis and Incomes Policy: 1968(3)-1988(3)’, The Manchester School, June, 142-164.
M.J. Watts and W.F. Mitchell (1990) 'The Impact of Incomes Policy on the Male Inter-industry Wage Structure’ Journal of Industrial Relations, 32 (3) September, 353-66.
W.F. Mitchell (1990) 'High Farce: The 1990-91 Premiers’ Conference’, Public Service Review, 27(7), August.N/A
W.F. Mitchell (1991) 'Wage Policy and Wages Determination in 1990’, Journal of Industrial Relations, 33 (1), March, 111-119.
M.J. Watts and W.F. Mitchell (1991) 'Alleged Instability of the Okun’s Law Relationship in Australia: An Empirical Analysis’, Applied Economics, 23, December, 1829-38.
W.F. Mitchell (1992) 'Too little, Too late: 1992-93 Budget Commentary’, Australian Left Review, April, No.138.
W.F. Mitchell (1993) 'Nation-Building’, Australian Left Review, March.
W.F. Mitchell (1993) 'The impact of immigration in the trades’ labour market’, People and Place, 1(2) June, 23-34.
W.F. Mitchell (1993) 'Demystifying the Deficit’, Arena, October/November, 7.N/A
W.F. Mitchell (1993) 'Testing for Unit Roots and Persistence in OECD Unemployment Rates’, Applied Economics, 25, December, 1489-1501.
W.F. Mitchell (1994) 'Restoring Full Employment: A Problem of Policy Balance’ The Australian Economic Review, First Quarter, 24-31.
W.F. Mitchell (1994) 'It profiteth us not’, Arena, October/November.N/A
W.F. Mitchell (1995) 'Business Welfare - A legitimate role for government?’, Current Affairs Bulletin, 71(6), April.N/A
W.F. Mitchell, C. Boys and C. Downs (1995) 'Measuring Leg Length Discrepancy’, Australian Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport, Abstracts, 47-48.N/A
W.F. Mitchell (1996) 'Post Keynesian Thought Discussion List’, in Electronic Journal of Radical Organisation Theory, 2, June.
W.F. Mitchell (1996) 'Budget: Light from the Black Hole’, Arena, 1996, 24, August-September.
W.F. Mitchell (1996) 'Why high levels of net migration present problems for unemployment and external debt stabilisation’, People and Place, 4(1), 40-46.
W.F. Mitchell and R. Denniss (1997) 'Dividends of Pain’, Arena, 27, February-March.
W.F. Mitchell and M.J. Watts (1997) 'The Path to Full Employment’, Australian Economic Review, 30(4), 1997, 436-44
J. Burgess and W.F. Mitchell (1998) 'Unemployment, Human Rights and a Full Employment Policy in Australia’ Australian Journal of Human Rights, Vol. 4, Issue 2, 1998.
W.F. Mitchell and J. Burgess (1998) 'Eight Propositions About Unemployment: An Australian Perspective”, Forum on Unemployment: New Visions, International Industrial Relations Society, Bologna, Italy.N/A
W.F. Mitchell (1998) 'The Buffer Stock Employment Model and the NAIRU: The Path to Full Employment’, Journal of Economic Issues, 32(2), 547-55.
J. Burgess and W.F. Mitchell (1998) 'Employment, Unemployment and the Right to Work’, Australian Journal of Human Rights, 4(2), 76-94.N/A
J. Burgess, W.F. Mitchell, D. O’Brien, and M.J. Watts (1998) 'Unemployment: Promises, Policies and Progress’, Labour and Industry, 9(2), 103-22.N/A
J. Burgess, W.F. Mitchell, D. O’Brien and M.J. Watts (2000) 'The Developing Workfare Policy in Australia: A Critical Assessment’, Journal of Socio-Economics, 29, 173-88.
M.J. Watts and W.F. Mitchell (2000) 'The Costs of Unemployment’, Economic and Labour Relations Review, 11(2), 180-197.
W.F. Mitchell (2000) 'The Job Guarantee in a small open economy’, in E. Carlson and W.F. Mitchell (eds.), The Path to Full Employment, Supplement to Volume 11, The Economic and Labour Relations Review, Industrial Relations Research Centre, UNSW, Sydney, 89-116.
W.F. Mitchell and E. Carlson (2000) 'The Path to Full Employment’, in E. Carlson and W.F. Mitchell (eds.), The Path to Full Employment, Supplement to Volume 11, The Economic and Labour Relations Review, Industrial Relations Research Centre, UNSW, Sydney, 1-11.
W.F. Mitchell (2001) 'The Job Guarantee and Inflation Control’, in E. Carlson and W.F. Mitchell (eds.), Achieving Full Employment, Supplement to Volume 12, The Economic and Labour Relations Review, Industrial Relations Research Centre, UNSW, Sydney, 10-25.
A. Valadkhani and W.F. Mitchell (2002) 'Assessing the Impact of Changes in Petroleum Prices on Inflation and Household Expenditures in Australia’, Australian Economic Review, 35(2), June, 122-132.
D. Biddle, J. Burgess, W.F. Mitchell, and M. O’Brien (2002) 'The Australian Labour Market in 2001’, The Journal of Industrial Relations, June, 44(2), 171-197.
W.F. Mitchell and W. Mosler (2002) 'Fiscal Policy and the Job Guarantee’, Australian Journal of Labour Economics, 5(2), June, 243-60.
B. Cook, C. Dodds, and W.F. Mitchell (2003) 'Social Entrepreneurship: False Premises and Dangerous Forebodings’, Australian Journal of Social Issues, 38(1), February, 57-75.
J. Burgess, W.F. Mitchell, and A. Preston (2003) 'The Australian Labour Market in 2002’, The Journal of Industrial Relations, 5(2), June, 125-150.
S. Cowling and W.F. Mitchell (2003) 'False promise or false premise? Evaluating the Job Network’, Australian Journal of Labour Economics, 6(2), June.
M.J. Watts and W.F. Mitchell (2004) 'Wages and Wage Determination in 2003’, The Journal of Industrial Relations, 46(2), June, 160-183.
W.F. Mitchell and Watts, M.J. (2004) 'A Comparison of the Macroeconomic Consequences of Basic Income and Job Guarantee Schemes’, Rutgers Journal of Law and Urban Policy, 2 1-24.
W.F. Mitchell and L.R. Wray (2005) 'In Defense of the Employer of Last Resort: A Response to Malcolm Sawyer’, Journal of Economic Issues, 39 (1), March, pp235-244.
M.J. Watts and W.F. Mitchell (2005) 'Wages and Wage Determination in 2004’, The Journal of Industrial Relations, 47(2), June, 151-170.
W.F. Mitchell and Carlson, E. (2005) 'Exploring employment growth disparities across metropolitan and regional Australia’, Australasian Journal of Regional Studies, 11(1), 25-40.
S. Cowling, W.F. Mitchell and M.J. Watts (2006) 'The right to work versus the right to income’, International Journal of Environment, Workplace and Employment, 2(1), 89-113.
M.J. Watts and W.F. Mitchell (2006) 'Wages and Wage Determination in 2005’, The Journal of Industrial Relations, 48(2), June.
W.F. Mitchell and W.B. Mosler (2006) 'Understanding the economic fallacies of the intergenerational debate’, Australian Journal of Social Issues, 41(2), 159-170.
A. Bill, S. Cowling, W.F. Mitchell and V. Quirk (2006) 'Employment programs for people with a psychiatric disability: the case for change’, Australian Journal of Social Issues, 1(2), 209-220.
S. Cowling, R. LaJeunesse, W.F. Mitchell and M.J. Watts (2006) 'Workchoices: the low productivity road to an underclass’, Australian Journal of Social Issues, 1(2), 221-232.
A. Bill, W.F. Mitchell and M.J. Watts (2006) 'Examining the relationship between commuting patterns, employment growth and unemployment in the NSW greater metropolitan region’, Australian Journal of Social Issues, 1(2), 233-245.
W.F. Mitchell, J. Myers and J. Juniper (2006) 'The dynamics of job creation and destruction in Australia’, Australian Journal of Social Issues, Special Winter edition, 247-259.
W.F. Mitchell (2006) 'Accommodating Employment: A Job Guarantee’, Parity, 19(4), 24-26.
S. Cowling and W.F. Mitchell (2007) 'Taking the low road: minimum wage determination under 'Work Choices’’, Australian Journal of Industrial Relations, 49 (5), Nov, 741-756.
W.F. Mitchell and A. Bill (2006) 'Who benefits from Growth? Disadvantaged workers in growing regions’, Australian Journal of Labour Economics, 9(2), June, 239-255.
W.F. Mitchell and A. Bill (2006) 'The two-speed economy: the decline of Sydney's labour market’, People and Place, 14(4), December, 14-24.
M.J. Watts and W.F. Mitchell (2007) 'Wages and Wage Determination in 2006’, The Journal of Industrial Relations, 49, 327-344.
A. Bill, W.F. Mitchell and R. Welters (2007) 'Job mobility and segmentation in Australian city labour markets’, International Journal of Environment, Workplace and Employment, 3, 3/4, 212-229.
W.F. Mitchell and J. Myers (2008) 'Are gross job flows in Australia sensitive to exchange rate fluctuations?’, International Journal of Environment, Workplace and Employment, 3, 3/4, 248-265.
M.J. Watts and W.F. Mitchell (2008) 'Wages and Wage Determination in 2007’, The Journal of Industrial Relations, 50 (3), 399-416.
A. Bill, Mitchell, W.F. and M.J. Watts (2008) 'The Occupational Dimensions of Local Labour Markets in Australian Cities’, Built Environment, 34(3), 291-306.
S. Baum, A. Bill and W.F. Mitchell (2008) 'Labour Underutilisation in Metropolitan Labour Markets in Australia: Individual characteristics, personal circumstances and local labour markets’, Urban Studies, 45 (5 & 6), 1193-1216.
S. Baum, A. Bill and W.F. Mitchell (2008) 'Unemployment in non-metropolitan Australia: Integrating geography, social and individual contexts’, Australian Geographer, June, 39, 2, 193-210.
S. Baum, A. Bill and W.F. Mitchell (2008) 'Employment outcomes in non-metropolitan labour markets: Individual and regional labour market factors’, Australasian Journal of Regional Studies, 14(1), 5-25.
S. Baum, W.F. Mitchell and J.H. Han (2008) 'Socio-economic performance across Australia's functional economic regions’, Australasian Journal of Regional Studies, 14(3), 215-249.
S. Baum and W.F. Mitchell (2008) 'Adequate Employment, Underutilisation and Unemployment: an Analysis of Labour Force Outcomes for Australian Youth’, Australian Journal of Labour Economics, 11, 3, 187-201.
S. Baum, A. Bill and W.F. Mitchell (2009) 'Employability and labour underutilisation in non-metropolitan labour markets’, Regional Studies, 43, 8, 1091-1103.
S. Baum and W.F. Mitchell (2010) 'People, space and place: a multidimensional analysis of unemployment in metropolitan labour markets’, Geographical Research, 48(1), 13-23.
W.F. Mitchell and M.J. Watts (2010) 'Identifying Functional Regions in Australia Using Hierarchical Aggregation Techniques’, Geographical Research, 48(1), 24-41.
S. Baum and W.F. Mitchell (2010) 'Labour Underutilisation and Gender: Unemployment verses Hidden-Unemployment’, Population Research and Policy Review, 29, 233-248.
W.F. Mitchell and J. Muysken (2010) 'Full employment abandoned: shifting sands and policy failures', International Journal of Public Policy, 5(4), 295-313.N/A
S. Baum and W.F. Mitchell (2010) 'Adequate employment, underutilisation, and unemployment: an analysis of labour force outcomes for Australian youth’, Australian Journal of Labour Economics.N/A
R. Stimson, W.F. Mitchell, David Rohde and Paul Shyy (2011) 'Using functional economic regions to model endogenous regional performance in Australia: implications for addressing the spatial autocorrelation problem’, Regional Science Policy and Practice, 3(3), 131–144.
G. Daraganova, P. Pattison, J. Koskinen, W.F. Mitchell, A. Bill, M. Watts, and S. Baum (2012) 'Networks and geography: Modelling community network structures as the outcome of both spatial and network processes', Social Networks, 34(1), Jan, 6-17.

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Op Ed articles

This is an imperfect record. I stopped accumulating these some years ago once I channeled my Op Ed drafts into my blog.

Coming in time.

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Commissioned Reports

Coming in time once they are processed and scanned.

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Professor Bill Mitchell

Business Office:

G15V 162 Albert Street
East Melbourne 3002 Victoria
Australia

© William Mitchell 2015

Contact

+61-(0)419 422 410

Bill.Mitchell@newcastle.edu.au